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Rental Rundown: When to Sell a Property That's Not Making You Money

Selling a rental property can be a tough decision, especially when it's not making you money. But sometimes, it's best to cut your losses and move on. So, when is it time to sell a rental property that's not making you money? Let's take a look at some signs that it's time to say goodbye to your rental property.

  1. The property is always vacant: If you're constantly struggling to find tenants to fill your rental property, it may be time to sell. A vacant property not only means a loss of income, but it also means additional expenses like property maintenance and utilities. You might find yourself wondering, "Why did I ever think becoming a landlord was a good idea? I should have just invested in a rock collection."

  2. The property is costing you more than it's making you: Being a landlord can be expensive, from repairs and maintenance to property taxes and insurance. But if these costs are consistently outweighing the income you're making from rent, it's time to reevaluate your investment. You may start to feel like you're playing a game of Whack-a-Mole with your expenses, and you're the one getting whacked.

  3. You're constantly dealing with difficult tenants: Being a landlord can be a lot of work, and dealing with difficult tenants can make it even harder. If you're constantly dealing with late rent payments, property damage, or eviction proceedings, it may be time to say goodbye to your rental property. Dealing with tenants can make you feel like you're playing a game of Tetris, but instead of blocks, you're juggling complaints and drama.

  4. You're not enjoying being a landlord: Let's face it, being a landlord isn't for everyone. If you're not enjoying being a landlord, or if you're feeling burnt out and stressed, it may be time to sell your rental property. Being a landlord can be a lot like being a parent, except you don't get to choose who moves in and out, and you're not allowed to ground them.



Now, you may be thinking "But why do so many landlords fail? Why can't I make it work?" Well, there are a few reasons why many landlords fail:

  1. Lack of knowledge and experience: Being a landlord requires a lot of knowledge and experience, from property management to tenant screening and eviction proceedings. If you don't have this knowledge and experience, it can be easy to make mistakes and lose money. It's like trying to fly a plane without ever having taken a flying lesson, it's not going to end well.

  2. Not setting realistic expectations: Many landlords get into the rental game with unrealistic expectations, thinking they'll make a fortune with little to no work. But the reality is, being a landlord is a lot of work and it's important to set realistic expectations. It's like thinking that buying a food truck is going to make you the next Guy Fieri, it's not that simple.

  3. Not having enough cash flow: Being a landlord requires a lot of cash flow, from repairs and maintenance to property taxes and insurance. If you don't have enough cash flow, it can be easy to get into financial trouble. It's like trying to run a marathon without training, you're going to hit a wall pretty quickly.

  4. Not having the right team: Being a landlord is a lot of work, and it's important to have the right team in place to help you manage your property. This includes a property manager, a handyman, and a lawyer. It's like trying to build a house without a contractor, an electrician and a plumber, you're going to have a lot of problems.

  5. Not being ready for the emotional rollercoaster: Being a landlord can be emotionally draining, you might have to deal with tenants who are constantly late with rent payments or cause damage to the property, and it can take a toll on you. It's like trying to ride a rollercoaster with a weak stomach, you're going to regret it.

In conclusion, selling a rental property that's not making you money can be a difficult decision, but it's important to weigh the pros and cons and consider the signs that it's time to move on. Being a landlord requires a lot of knowledge, experience, cash flow, a good team and emotional strength. If you're not ready for it, it's better to let it go and look for other investment options. It's not for everyone, and that's okay. Remember, not every investment is a winner, and it's important to know when to cut your losses and move on.




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